What’s more fun than trying on clothes? Trying them on in a virtual fitting room

Posted at 2:28 pm, June 25, 2014 in Around Town

Virtual dressing rooms are fab. They combine the convenience of online shopping with the fun of playing a grown-up game of Paper Doll. If you haven’t tried one out yet, head over to Ikebukuro Parco this week and step inside this free pop-up virtual fitting room by Urban Research. It’s called ‘Wearable Clothing by Urban Research’ and lets you ‘try on’ different items from the store. Way more satisfying than fiddling with zips and buttons and bad lighting in a real dressing room.

You’ll find it on the B1 floor of the department store until June 30, and although it’s not that difficult to figure out – there’s an English language option – there’s someone on hand to guide you through the process, from stepping onto the red carpet to purchasing your chosen item:

Step 1: Stand on the marked spot, next to the iPad and facing the screen. Hold up your dominant hand and wave it madly across your body. This prompts the computer to map out your body.

Step 2: Hold up the same hand and hover it over the circles on the screen to make your clothing choices. Once your chosen item appears over your body on the screen, use the iPad next to you to adjust the item’s position on your body. Throw in a few cheesy poses, arm swings and leg lifts and marvel at how the item moves with your body.

Step 3: Once you’ve decided which item you like best, select the photo option, smile for the camera, and wait for the QR code to either print or be emailed to your phone (download a QR reader app if you don’t already have one).

Step 4: Scan in the QR code to see yourself ‘wearing’ your item of choice. From here you can link directly to the online store and buy it, but this part is only in Japanese, so you could also just nip into the store and snap it up from the shelf.


To view more clothing by Urban Research, go to their online store.

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Comments

  1. [...] of the texture of the clothing materials (so-called “cloth simulation”). As the Time Out blogger put it, “way more satisfying than fiddling with zips and buttons and bad lighting in a real [...]

  2. [...] experience of the texture of the clothing materials (so-called “cloth simulation”). As the Time Out blogger put it, “way more satisfying than fiddling with zips and buttons and bad lighting in a real [...]

 

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